Resources for Online and Hybrid Teaching

The online environment has become much easier for most people to access as high-speed internet and mobile devices are now common. This new space has created an opportunity for teaching and learning to occur outside the classroom as well as inside it.

The field of internet-enabled education is huge, but below we present an introduction, and encourage you to read further and ask us questions.

Definitions:

It’s possible to get lost in a wilderness of terms like blended, hybrid, flipped and technology-enhanced. We will keep things simple here. The UC Irvine Academic Senate Subcommittee on Courses (SCOC) formally recognizes three types of courses:

Traditional Course

course centered on scheduled meeting times in a common physical location between instructors and students, with minimal required use of online tools

Hybrid Course

course that uses scheduled meeting times in a common physical location between instructors and students and a significant fraction of required online tools.

Online Course

course with no required scheduled meeting times in a common physical location between instructors and students (though meetings at a common time using online tools may be required)

Beyond this straightforward separation are variants.

Why use online tools?

Adding online components to a course doesn’t make it inherently more effective. Generally online components are added to solve a particular problem. Examples of effective, evidence-based uses include:

Online components can also solve more practical issues:

But moving content online just because the option is available and without careful thought can lead to problems with course effectiveness like bloating of content, or increased absenteeism, or reduction in instructor interaction with students.

Want to learn more about online tools and instruction?

At this point, your options diverge. If you are merely looking to better understand online learning, we will list some good additional readings at the end of this article. If you are ready to begin work on an online course and want a 1-hour consult to help you plan out your steps, contact Megan Linos, the Director of the UCI Center for Instructional Design, wlinos@uci.edu.